From The Verge:

Nintendo is bringing back the NES — only a little smaller.

Today the company announced what it’s calling the Nintendo Entertainment System: NES Classic Edition. It looks just like a NES, only a lot tinier, and it comes with 30 games built in. You can connect it to your TV via a HDMI cable, and it also includes a controller designed to work just like the iconic rectangular NES gamepad. (The new controller will also connect to a Wii Remote, so that you can use it to play Virtual Console games on a Wii or Wii U.)

JUST TAKE MY DAMN MONEY, NINTENDO.

From Macworld:

Mail did get a few tweaks that make wrangling the unwieldiest of inboxes easier than ever. I’ve been using the iOS 10 developer beta on a 12.9-inch iPad Pro for the last couple weeks, and the public beta since its launch. Here are four of my favorite new Mail features. If you’ve found any other changes in the Mail app, share them with us in the comments.

The three-pane view in Mail and Notes is really nice on the larger iPad Pro.

About a month ago, I wrote that my wife, mother-in-law, and I had switched from the iPhone 6s to the iPhone SE. In the month that I was using the iPhone SE, I decided that I really didn’t like how small it was so this past Friday, I once again took advantage of T-Mobile’s JUMP On-Demand feature and switched to an iPhone 6s Plus.

Surprisingly, it didn’t take me very long to get used to the drastic change in size. When I originally upgraded from the iPhone 5s, I went to the iPhone 6 Plus and felt like it took me weeks to get used to how huge it was. This time it was markedly different–it felt normal versus the tiny size of the iPhone SE.

I guess my indecision about iPads and sizes has somewhat spilled over into the realm of the iPhone now. That said though, I think I’ve settled on the devices I’ll keep going forward. In addition to doing normal “phone stuff”, the iPhone 6s Plus is big enough that I can use it to read comfortably in bed (the 12.9″ iPad Pro is sometimes a bit awkward to use lying down) and the 12.9″ iPad Pro remains my workhorse for everything else.

Ever since the WWDC announcement a few months ago, I’ve wanted to get my hands on the font they used–which appeared to be a monospaced version of the San Francisco system font–but it wasn’t available anywhere.

That changed on Monday with the release of the Xcode 8 beta. Not only is SF Mono a real thing, I’ve installed it in Coda on my iPad and it’s glorious. If you’d like to grab the font, you can find it inside the Fonts directory in the Xcode 8 beta package:

sf-mono-location

Enjoy :)

SF Mono in Coda for iOS

sf-mono-location

In what has become normal practice after the WWDC keynote, I’ve installed the latest iOS beta on my devices. This year is a little different than the few previous as I’ve installed it on both my iPad and my iPhone. This the first time I’ve run a developer beta on my phone since the iOS 6 betas a few years ago–typically I only install it on my iPad. I’m not sure what made this year different, but oh well :)

Some quick thoughts:

  • I love the new 3-pane interface for Mail and Notes on the iPad Pro (9to5Mac has more info and screenshots)

  • My favorite feature that I’ve come across so far are the videos you can generate for each person’s photos in the People section of the Photos app. They are awesome.

  • I really like the updates to the Maps app.

  • Spotlight search is super-fast.

  • I like the system UI updates (notifications, etc).

  • The Apple Music changes are great. Also, IT NOW WORKS WITH SPLIT SCREEN!!!

Overall, some apps are a little crashy, but I’m not complaining–that’s to be expected, especially with the first beta build. I definitely feel like the changes so far are a step in the right direction and can’t wait to see how things progress as they stabilize over the course of the additional betas up to release in the fall.

Back in October, I made some changes so a different color scheme was shown depending on the time of day. I was using PHP to handle the changes at the time and ended up getting rid of it because it didn’t play nice with the caching I was using.

Anyway, earlier today I reimplemented the feature in javascript, and the theme you see is now based on your local time of day instead of the server time of day. If you visit the site between 7am and 8pm Pacific, you’ll see the default light theme. If you visit between 8pm and 7am, you’ll see a dark theme.

Please let me know if you notice any issues.

From hueniverse:

A decade later, I’m the founder of a scrappy startup trying to reinvent web conversations. We have limited resources and a staff of almost 3, struggling to tame this fucking web. It is amazing how hard it still is to build innovative, quality web experiences. It is very much possible – there are plenty of amazing web developers building mind blowing experiences. The problem is, I can’t afford to hire them, especially since a big chunk of them work for Google and Facebook.